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Life & Style

London Irish photographer Rich McCor’s clever pictures completely change how you see famous landmarks

His picture transformed London's City Hall into a snail. (Picture: Instagram)
His picture transformed London’s City Hall into a snail. (Picture: Instagram)

A LONDON photographer is giving people a fresh perspective of the most famous landmarks in the world with his unique style of photography. 

Rich McCor, a 28-year-old from London whose family comes from Ireland, uses tiny paper cutouts to reimagine the famous buildings and iconic structures from around the world.

His project has taken him around Britain, to Ireland and across Europe.

More Life & Style:

McCor has captured the London Eye, the Spire of Dublin and the Little Mermaid in Denmark, to name but a few of his subjects.

See some of his best ones here…

The London Eye, London, Britain

In 2011 charity worker Lloyd Scott completed the London Marathon dressed as a snail. He spent 26 days on his hands and knees crawling his way towards the finish line, suffering nose bleeds and cramp along the way. Just days later, the charity he completed the marathon for, sacked him due to “losses incurred”. It turns out the elaborate snail costume, support costs and publicity cost the charity a lot more than Mr Scott managed to raise #londoncityhall #towerbridge #londonmarathon #marathon #snail #london #london4all #thisislondon #travel #londonlife #cityoflondon #instalondon #londonforyou #igerslondon #animalart #shutup_london #prettycitylondon #instalondon #ilovelondon #visitlondon #instalondon #paperart #architecture #architecturelovers #architectureporn #topphotolondon @london @architecturelondon

A photo posted by Rich McCor (@paperboyo) on

City Hall, London, Britain

This is the iconic Spire rising up from the centre of Dublin. You might already know that Colin Farrell is from here, but Dublin gave Hollywood an even bigger star; Slats the lion. Never heard of him? He was the original lion that roars in the clip at the beginning of MGM films. Dublin also gave Hollywood the Oscar statuette; it was designed by local man Cedric Gibbons #dublin #dublincity #igersdublin #lovindublin #lovedublin #discoverdublin #instadublin @dublindiaries @visitdublin @picturethisdublin #loveireland #ireland_gram #paper #dancer #poledance #poledancing #silhouette #wanderlust #travel #adventure #passionpassport #architectureporn #architecturelovers #instagram #hollywood #oscar #film #thespire #spire #intepidtravel #architecture @lovindublin

A photo posted by Rich McCor (@paperboyo) on

The Spire, Dublin, Ireland

Towards the end of WWI, France built a ‘Second Paris’ near the capital city to confuse German pilots. It was located near the town of Maisons-Laffitte, on a stretch of the River Seine. As well as replicas of iconic landmarks, including the Arc de Triomphe, it even had sham streets lined with electric lights so that from the sky it would look like a real city. Shot for #lpkids (@lonelyplanet’s brand for little adventurers) #arcdetriomphe #lonelyplanet #instaart #paris #parisjetaime #parisian #topparisphoto #visitparis #parismaville #igersparis #loves_paris #igersfrance #citytrip #wanderlust #travel #adventure #passionpassport #instagram #travelandlife #intrepidtravel #adventureinstagoodmyphoto #guardiancities #guardiantravelsnaps #bestintravel #lego #paperart #loves_paris #champselysees #silhouette

A photo posted by Rich McCor (@paperboyo) on

Arc de Triomphe, Paris, France

The Little Mermaid, Copenhagen, Denmark

Notre Dame, Paris, France

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James Mulhall
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James Mulhall is a reporter with The Irish Post. Follow him on Twitter @JamzMulhall

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